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As National Geographic explained in a recent article about the drilling, ReconAfrica’s “license area supports various endangered species, such as African wild dogs, white-backed vultures, and Temminck’s ground pangolins. Africa’s largest remaining trans-boundary population of savanna elephants moves through it. In Namibia, the license area is home to more than 200,000 people”.

Their investigative series is here:

The petroleum exploration company ReconAfrica doesn’t appear to have taken what experts say is a key step to prevent contamination of groundwater.

ReconAfrica investor reports from May 2019 to March 2020 show how ReconAfrica came to “own” this landscape, and touts its plan to “sell” it to their investors by the acre, -out from under the people who call this incredible region home. The company were planning to drill “100’s of wells” based on “production from horizontals” and “modern frac simulations”

Resources

More resources include their original EIA, in three parts, including the Scoping Report, the Environmental Impact Assessment and their Environmental Management Plan.

More Press Articles

Africa Geographic

AfricaNews

Africa Sustainable Conservation News

Afrik21

Al Jazeera

Allafrica.com

AP

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre

Canadians.org

Cape Argus

Daily Maverick

Deutsche Welle

Energy Transition

Energy Voice

Environment News Service

Greenpeace

Independent

Inter Press Service

Mail & Guardian

Mongabay

PetroOnline

Sky News

The Conversation:

The Globe and Mail

The Guardian

The Hill

The Namibian

Yale Environment 360

The Namibian

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